This Griff has a 400HP Ford V8 coupled to a Jerico gearbox, this makes it very interesting to drive bearing in mind the short wheel base. Currently we are redesigning the front suspension to incorporate better suspension geometry and larger AP racing brakes as part of our development programme for the car.

1965 TVR Griffith

The TVR Griffith has a fantastic story of its conception and creation - too long to write about here but worth Googling!

This 1965 racing Griffith came from America and is therefore left-hand drive. In order to race this car in this country we had to carry out some fairly significant changes to much of the car Including modifications to the roll cage, fuel system, electrical system and the installation of a fire extinguisher system. One of the biggest changes to the car was the exhaust note - it came to us with a straight through exhaust with no possibility of passing UK track noise tests. It now has a huge straight through silencer which has passed the noise tests with decibels to spare.

TECHNOLOGY   PASSION   INNOVATION

Taylor Automotive Engineering

Unit 3 Willow Farm

Scrapers Hill

Chiddingly

East Sussex

BN8 6HJ


Telephone: 01825 873578

Email: geoff@taylor-automotive.co.uk

2016 Update


During the front suspension rebuild we also had the engine refreshed by SD racing services. We then went up to see Peter Knight at Knight Racing Services to get it dyno'd to make sure the fuelling was right. The result was 450HP and 400 lbsft of torque in a very flat curve.


The front suspension has been redesigned to give lighter steering and much improved self centring. This has been achieved by increasing the KPI and castor angles with reference to the overall upright height to maintain optimal camber change during bump, droop and roll.

Whilst the assemble boasts larger bearings, brake calipers and discs the weight has been reduced 5.23Kgs over the old assembly.

We have installed the biggest brakes we could get in the 15" wheels. AP four pot racing calipers originally design for rally cars and 304mm diameter vented discs.


The uprights have been designed to accept cooling ducts which channel air into the centre of the disc and also through the centre of the spindles to cool the wheel bearings.


We are hoping that with these
improvements and a more radical rear suspension setup that the Griffith might
be a little more forgiving to drive.